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Ubiquitous Fallacies 'Outliers'

Topics: Outliers Feature

Sean Trende thinks O'Donnell's win is just a footnote to a greater Republican wave; Clive Crook responds; Gary Langer says Democrats should still fear Tea Party candidates.

Alex Bratty notes that Democratic candidates are turning their backs on Obama.

Stu Rothenberg prefers partisan pollsters.

Mark Mellman makes the case for sampling from registered voter lists.

Nate Silver points out that "tightening" polls may actually be a results of pollsters switching to likely voter screens.

Julie Phelan says Barack and Michelle Obama and Sarah Palin are all campaign trail liabilities.

Josh Krashaar thinks polling shouldn't trump common sense.

Democracy Corps finds Democrats on solid ground on dropping the Bush tax cuts for the wealthy; Geoff Garin supplies tax talking points to Democrats (via Smith).

David Hill advises Democrats to confess their mistakes.

Joe Lenski wonders if Republican delegate rules could prolong the primary process in 2012.

Chris Bowers offers the "ubiquitous political junkie fallacy."

 

Comments
s.b.:

Langer says 93% of strong supporters of the tea party movement say they are registered to vote and that 90% of them strongly intend to vote. If correct, that's an 84% turn out rate in an mid-term election.

Thems fightin numbers, even in Delaware.

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AlanSnipes:

sb: Duh, how many voters does a 84% turnout of tea party morons compared to the number of independents and Democrats? THey are a majority of the Republican Party, but most independents don't like them. If what you said is true, why is O'Donnel trailing big time in Delaware?

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